Carl von Weiner, Lullaby, 2000. Installation view courtesy the artist and Matt's Gallery, London.
Carl von Weiner, Lullaby, 2000. Invitation card.
Carl von Weiner, Lullaby, 2000. Invitation card.
Carl von Weiner, Lullaby, 2000. Installation view courtesy the artist and Matt's Gallery, London.

Carl von Weiner, Lullaby, 2000. Installation view courtesy the artist and Matt's Gallery, London.

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Carl von Weiler

Lullaby

19 April – 25 May 2000

Copperfield Road

Lullaby is Carl von Weiler’s first exhibition for Matt’s Gallery. Over recent months the artist has been physically reshaping Gallery One to construct three new spaces. Dividing the gallery into three parts has changed the geometry of the space, substantially altering the quality of sound and light within it. Whilst also creating different atmospheres within each section. The first space is empty, acting as a threshold to the rooms beyond. On entering this space the visitor is faced with two openings leading to further spaces on the canal-side.


Carl von Weiler’s new installation employs sound and video to explore his continued interest in notions essential to sculpture - namely those of gravity, levity and touch - established in earlier pieces such as Matrix and Drop It. With this new work he has separated the sound from the video, isolating each in their own space. This separation produces a tension within the piece.


In one room the artist has built a wall that hangs from the ceiling, replicating and extending the existing concrete beams, but hovering a meter above the floor, plastered and unpainted. The video is projected onto this screen-wall. The artist has filmed himself strapped to a bed, hanging from the ceiling and holding a musical device. His movements are awkward and exaggerated, demonstrating the control needed when a body has been inverted and is working against gravity. The absence of sound from the film further emphasises the projection’s function and scale in relation to the newly constructed space and architecture, and the artist’s use of the screen-wall as a sculptural device. The sound removed from the film seeps throughout the gallery, drawing the visitor through to the second room, where it fills the space.

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