Uncaptioned image from Revolver II, Part 3: Perform by Patrick Goddard, Jaki Irvine, Lucia Nogueira and X Marks the Bökship at Matt’s Gallery
Jaki Irvine, The Actress, 2003 and Star, 1994. Installation view, Revolver II (Part 3: Perform), 2014. Image by Peter White, courtesy of the artist and Matt’s Gallery, London.
Jaki Irvine, The Actress, 2003 and Star, 1994. Installation view, Revolver II (Part 3: Perform), 2014. Image by Peter White, courtesy of the artist and Matt’s Gallery, London.
Jaki Irvine, The Actress, 2003. Installation view, Revolver II (Part 3: Perform), 2014. Image by Peter White, courtesy of the artist and Matt’s Gallery, London.
Jaki Irvine, Star, 1994. Installation view, Revolver II (Part 3: Perform), 2014. Image by Peter White, courtesy of the artist and Matt’s Gallery, London.
Jaki Irvine, Star, 1994. Installation view, Revolver II (Part 3: Perform), 2014. Image by Peter White, courtesy of the artist and Matt’s Gallery, London.
Lucia Nogueira, Untitled, 1998. Installation view, Revolver II (Part 3: Perform), 2014. Image by Peter White, courtesy of the artist and Matt’s Gallery, London.
Lucia Nogueira, Untitled, 1998. Installation view, Revolver II (Part 3: Perform), 2014. Image by Peter White, courtesy of the artist and Matt’s Gallery, London.
Patrick Goddard, A Social Contract, 2014. Installation view, Revolver II (Part 3: Perform), 2014. Image by Peter White, courtesy of the artist and Matt’s Gallery, London.
Patrick Goddard, Autocue, 2010-2014. Installation view, Revolver II (Part 3: Perform), 2014. Image by Peter White, courtesy of the artist and Matt’s Gallery, London.
Patrick Goddard, Autocue, 2010-2014. Installation view, Revolver II (Part 3: Perform), 2014. Image by Peter White, courtesy of the artist and Matt’s Gallery, London.
Patrick Goddard, Autocue, 2010-2014. Installation view, Revolver II (Part 3: Perform), 2014. Image by Peter White, courtesy of the artist and Matt’s Gallery, London.
Patrick Goddard, Free Radical, 2013. Installation view, Revolver II (Part 3: Perform), 2014. Image by Peter White, courtesy of the artist and Matt’s Gallery, London.
Patrick Goddard, Free Radical, 2013. Installation view, Revolver II (Part 3: Perform), 2014. Image by Peter White, courtesy of the artist and Matt’s Gallery, London.
Uncaptioned image from Revolver II, Part 3: Perform by Patrick Goddard, Jaki Irvine, Lucia Nogueira and X Marks the Bökship at Matt’s Gallery
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Patrick Goddard, Jaki Irvine, Lucia Nogueira and X Marks the Bökship

Revolver II, Part 3: Perform

19 November – 14 December 2014

Copperfield Road

* Perform: to accomplish an action, to make manifest to an audience, to transform a location into a theatre, to enunciate, to consummate, prepared by rehearsal, encore after, followed by a curtain call.

Patrick Goddard, Free Radicals (2013), As yet Untitled (2010–14)

Goddard's recent works have taken the form of videos, books, performances and sculpture; all with an emphasis on observational anecdotes or research-led articles. Without becoming politically illustrative, many works explore socio-politically loaded issues from conceptions of evil to class politics, sociology to anarchy, the uncanny to the absurd. Saturated with a sense of pathos, narratives undermine themselves with a self-defeating humour, playfully calling into question the sincerity or authority of the narrator, and the artist.

Goddard's debut graphic novel Operation Paperclip (2014) was launched at Matt's Gallery as a trailer to Revolver II in June 2014.

Jaki Irvine, Star (1994), Actress (2003)

Through the use of forms that range from single screen or more complex multichannel video installations to photography, music com- position and writing, Irvine foregrounds the complex ways we imagine ourselves and the world around us. For Irvine, this activity has both philosophical and political implications. How we take our place and act as social beings is underpinned by how we construct and articulate our understanding of ourselves and others, both privately and collectively, and in her work Irvine seeks to re-examine these conflicting power relations, anxieties, desires and fantasies.

Lucia Nogueira, Monologue (1995), Untitled (1998)

Before her death in 1998, the Brazilian artist Lucia Nogueira was predominantly known for her sculptural installations using everyday objects, intentionally creating work that left questions unanswered, deferred closure and implicated the spectator in creating meaning by bringing to the work their own memories and imagination.